The North Bay Busi­ness Jour­nal recent­ly put on their 2019 Heath Care Con­fer­ence which high­light­ed physi­cian burnout. An alarm­ing trend in the med­ical com­mu­ni­ty but, unfor­tu­nate­ly, job burnout is not iso­lat­ed to just the med­ical field. A study done by Gallup of near­ly 7,500 full- time employ­ees found that rough­ly two-thirds of full-time work­ers expe­ri­ence job burnout. The study also found that burned out employ­ees are 63% more like­ly to take a sick day and 2.6 times as like­ly to be active­ly seek­ing a dif­fer­ent job. Employ­ee burnout that goes unad­dressed will impact both indi­vid­ual and orga­ni­za­tion­al per­for­mance. Here are some ways employ­ers can iden­ti­fy employ­ee burnout:

  • Dis­en­gage­ment
  • Decreased pro­duc­tiv­i­ty or qual­i­ty of work
  • Increased absen­teeism
  • Cyn­i­cism

Some Ways to han­dle employ­ee burnout

  • Try and get the employ­ee to open up
    ‑Talk­ing to the employ­ee expe­ri­enc­ing burnout will give you (the employ­er) a bet­ter idea of what the employ­ee is expe­ri­enc­ing and how you can help them.
  • Allow the employ­ee to take anoth­er posi­tion tem­porar­i­ly-Some peo­ple need a change of scenery. I have per­son­al­ly expe­ri­enced this where I worked in anoth­er depart­ment for a while just for change of pace, dif­fer­ent job and see­ing dif­fer­ent faces and location.
  • Encour­age PTO

As stat­ed above, some peo­ple need a change of scenery. Stud­ies have shown that tak­ing time away from the job can have phys­i­cal and psy­cho­log­i­cal health ben­e­fits. Time away has shown to low­er stress and lessen the risk of heart disease.

burned-out employ­ees are 63% more like­ly to take a sick day and 2.6

times as like­ly to be active­ly seek­ing a dif­fer­ent job. Employ­ee burnout that goes unaddressed

will impact both indi­vid­ual and orga­ni­za­tion­al per­for­mance.  Here are some ways employ­ers can iden­ti­fy employ­ee burnout:

▪  Dis­en­gage­ment

▪  Decreased pro­duc­tiv­i­ty or qual­i­ty of work

▪  Increased absenteeism

▪  Cyn­i­cism

Some Ways to Han­dle Employ­ee Burnout

▪  Try and get the employ­ee to open up

-Talk­ing to the employ­ee expe­ri­enc­ing burnout will give you (the employ­er) a bet­ter idea of what the employ­ee is expe­ri­enc­ing and how you can help them.

▪  Allow the employ­ee to take anoth­er posi­tion temporarily

-Some peo­ple need a change of scenery. I have per­son­al­ly expe­ri­enced this where I worked in anoth­er depart­ment for a while just for change of pace, dif­fer­ent job and see­ing dif­fer­ent faces and location.

▪  Encour­age PTO

-As stat­ed above, some peo­ple need a change of scenery. Stud­ies have shown that tak­ing time away from the job can have phys­i­cal and psy­cho­log­i­cal health ben­e­fits. Time away has shown to low­er stress and lessen the risk of heart disease.

By Andrew McNeil