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  • How to Implement an Employee Training Program | California Employee Benefits

    September 18, 2019

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    Employee training programs are beneficial to organizations of varying sizes. Even small companies can improve customer service skills. Large organizations often need training programs specifically targeted to employee development and changing technologies. The Society for Human Resource Management says that offering training programs to employees helps the employee feel more engaged and committed to the organization. Implement an employee training program in your organization to improve job morale and teach new skills.

    Step 1

    Analyze your organizational needs. Interview managers and supervisors and identify employee performance areas that need strengthening. Review employee performance appraisals to locate common performance problems. Call the human resources department of similarly sized and focused organizations and ask what training programs have been valuable to them.

    Step 2

    Present your research findings to the committee or the company’s leadership team. Prepare a detailed presentation and be prepared to answer questions. Outline the benefits of each proposed program, anticipated costs and time requirements. Demonstrate the need for each program by preparing detailed analysis of problem areas and possible solutions. Ask for input, suggestions and changes.

    Step 3

    Finalize your plan and determine your budget for the next fiscal year. Request funds using your company’s budgeting process. When calculating your employee training budget, include materials, travel, speaker fees, computer access charges and food in the budgeted amount. Ask for funds before the fiscal year begins rather than requesting unbudgeted money during the fiscal year.

    Step 4

    Take the total budget and allocate the funds by department, per employee or per training program, recommends the American Society for Training and Development. Consider the benefits you expect from each training program and decide if the cost of the program will give you the desired results. Decide if training programs will be required or optional.

    Step 5

    List the training classes you will offer over the next year. Divide the classes by type and employee attendance. Prepare a schedule and publish it on your company’s intranet. If possible, allow employees to sign up electronically to save valuable personnel time. Be sensitive to departmental schedules and work flow.

    Step 6

    Contract with outside firms or select and internal trainer to provide training. Call the potential trainer’s references and verify that his materials and presentation style fit your needs. Ask him to give you samples of his work, a quote of his complete fees and a list of any needed equipment. Outsourcing training can save money when you consider the administrative and program costs.

    Select an internal trainer for training programs you will handle. Ask an employee with expertise in the field to teach a class or utilize member of your company’s human resources department. Set clear expectations of class content and have a feedback system in place. Consider extra compensation if training is not part of the employee’s job description.

    Step 7

    Evaluate the success of each program immediately after the program’s completion. Ask the participants to fill out prepared evaluation forms. Analyze the comments to plan for further training. Follow-up with supervisors during the year to gauge the continued effectiveness of the training programs.

     

    by Diane Lynn
    Originally posted on Livestrong.com

  • Volunteering Time Off, Part Two

    September 9, 2019

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    Right now our national unemployment rate is 3.7%–edging towards a 50-year low. With this low rate, companies are actually finding it increasingly harder to hire and retain great talent. One way to combat this issue is by increasing employee engagement through volunteering.

     

    In survey after survey, employees state that they want to work for companies who care for others.  In fact, “71% of employees surveyed say it’s very important to work where culture supports volunteering,” according to America’s Charities Snapshot. There are different types of volunteer options when looking to begin a volunteer program at a company. For example, entire companies can come together for a big “Day of Service” event.  Or perhaps there is an ongoing need in the community, like Meals on Wheels, and employees sign up to help when needed by the charity. Offering pro bono services to non-profit community groups or donating skills for specific projects are other ways to assist charities in your area.

     

    The issue of time worked and pay typically comes up when talking about employer sponsored/encouraged volunteering. There are a couple different ways that companies structure this. One way is to simply pay employees for their usual time at the workplace even though they are not actually working on company business at the time of the volunteer project. This is typical of big “Day of Service” campaigns during the workweek. Another way is to encourage employees to donate their break or lunch time to complete volunteer service projects. Finally, and this is the emerging trend in employee benefits, is to give each employee Volunteer Time Off (VTO) hours as part of their benefits package.

     

    The benefits of VTO are numerous. One of the biggest values of VTO is that of employee recruitment and retention.  PricewaterhouseCoopers conducted a survey and the results were that “59% of Millennials gravitated towards companies with pronounced Corporate Social Responsibility programs.”  For retention, the value is even higher, “74% of employees say their job is more fulfilling when given the opportunity to make a positive impact at work.” Companies also see a benefit in camaraderie across departments and company hierarchy. Working together towards a common goal builds these interdepartmental relationships. Also, by playing towards strengths unseen in a regular office setting, employers have a chance to discover untapped leadership skills and completely unknown skill sets of employees. Finally, your company’s brand image is boosted by the view of its involvement in the community.

     

    Whatever the benefit that your company assigns to a healthy VTO program, be it retention, image, or team building, the fact remains that there WILL BE a benefit. If you are looking to begin the search for the right fitting program, there are great resources available for you. Check out this quick read on Charities.org and also the great tips on SalesForce.com. Start the conversation today with your leadership and start making an impact in your community!

  • Urgent Care vs. Emergency Room

    September 5, 2019

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    Let’s say you are getting ready to make your favorite breakfast—avocado toast. You’ve toasted the bread, cut the avocado in half, and are ready to remove the dreaded pit. Of course, your knife slips and you end up slicing your hand—making you the latest victim of “avocado hand.” It seems you cannot stop the bleeding with a simple bandage so now you need to make the decision on where to go to seek help. Do you choose an urgent care facility or the emergency room? What’s the difference?

    Urgent care centers and emergency rooms are both great options for times when you are unable to see your primary care physician (PCP). The reasons for choosing these facilities can be because the injury or sickness has occurred outside normal office hours for your doctor or that you are out of town when an emergency hits. As you know, the first choice for non-life or limb-threatening conditions should be your regular doctor—they will have your medical history on file and your medication list at the ready. When this is not an option, you will need to make the choice on what level of care you need.

     

    Urgent Care Centers

    Urgent care centers fill the gap between when you are sick or minorly injured but cannot see your PCP and when you are in need of hospital emergency care. Most urgent care locations are staffed by doctors or physician’s assistants. These centers can get you in and out quickly and some even take appointments. Since you will not see your PCP at these clinics, it’s always best to bring a copy of all the medications and dosages of meds you take. If you have a special condition, like epilepsy, make sure you disclose that to the urgent care provider you see. In the case of your avocado hand, your urgent care physician may be able to do minor stitches and bandaging at the facility. Most have access to x-ray machines and basic diagnostic tests. The typical range of costs for care at these centers is between $50-$150.

    Here are some conditions that typically can be seen at urgent care centers:

    • Fevers, flu or cold symptoms
    • Ear infections
    • Bronchitis
    • Cuts and bleeding that may require stitches
    • Urinary tract infections
    • Vomiting or diarrhea
    • Minor back pain

     

    Emergency Room Care

    Hospital emergency rooms provide care for life and limb-threatening situations ranging from heart attack and stroke to car accident injuries. Staffed by physicians, nurses, and specialists, emergency rooms have access to highly knowledgeable and diverse medical teams.  In emergency rooms, care is given to the most serious injury/illness first—not on a first-come, first-served basis. Because of this, wait times in emergency rooms are widely varied and may be into a several hours-long wait. Again, it is wise to bring a list of any medications, both prescribed and over-the-counter, with you when seeking care since the ER will not have this information from your PCP. Costs for emergency services can be anywhere from $50 to more than $10,000 depending on the severity of the injury or illness.

    Symptoms that are best evaluated in an emergency room include:

    • Chest pain or difficulty breathing
    • Weakness/numbness on one side
    • Slurred speech
    • Fainting/change in mental state
    • Serious burns
    • Head or eye injury
    • Concussion/confusion
    • Broken bones and dislocated joints
    • Fever with a rash
    • Seizures
    • Severe cuts that may require stitches
    • Facial lacerations
    • Severe cold or flu symptoms
    • Vaginal bleeding with pregnancy

     

    When faced with the decision to visit an urgent care center or emergency room, you have to first evaluate your symptoms. Once you have done this, ask yourself this question, “Does this condition have the possibility of permanently impairing or endangering your life?” If the answer is “yes,” then you have an emergency and should proceed to the nearest hospital ER. If the answer is “no,” then take your towel-wrapped avocado hand to your local urgent care center for stitches or whatever care they recommend. You will save yourself time and money by making a good choice on your care.

  • Affordability rules change a bit…yes, the ACA is still in effect

    August 28, 2019

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    When determining if an employee has “affordable” coverage for purposes of the penalty provision, in 2020 it will mean that their share of the premium payment exceeds 9.78% of their total annual wages.  This is a slight reduction from the amount used in 2019.

  • The Man with the Plan…Biden speaks

    August 26, 2019

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    Medicare for All is a great “catch all” for a plan that does not exist except in the minds of some Democrat candidates.  Joe Biden has a plan that is “like Medicare.”

    • Primary care covered without co-payments
    • Includes contraceptive care and abortion
    • Expands tax credits for purchasing insurance in the individual market
    • Has a surprise billing provision to avoid problems with out-of-network providers
    • Offers a Medicaid expansion alternative
    • Medicare can directly negotiate with pharmaceutical companies to lower drug costs
    • Drug price increases would be limited to the general inflation rate

    To avoid doubts on his apparent flip flopping, Biden would also repeal the Hyde Amendment, which prohibits the use of federal Medicaid dollars for abortion.

  • Cadillac Tax is in for repairs after a lot of delays

    August 21, 2019

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    The “Cadillac Tax” is a pending tax on employer-sponsored health plans whose value exceeds a legal limit (for being too rich in benefit).  The plans would be subject to a 40% excise tax, levied on the insurance companies, though it is expected the burden will fall on the employees. Originally, this tax was hardly noticed.  Once it received proper acknowledgement, it was not an immediate concern since (at the time) it was years away from going into effect.  Then the deadline approached and they pushed it back, and lawmakers have since pushed it back again.  Now Congress has decided to put the brakes on once and for all, passing a repeal bill with a vote of 419 for repeal and only 6 opposed.  One problem: the Senate, and what it is going to do for federal dollars to pay back the cost of individual coverage subsidies (which is what the tax was designed to offset in the first place).

  • And while Newsom made news he added another story…the Individual Mandate is back

    August 19, 2019

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    One of the concerns about the fate of Obamacare is how it can survive without the individual mandate requiring Americans to enroll in an adequate health plan.  Carriers demanded it as the price for their support, since a lack of a mandate would create considerable “adverse selection” and thus higher potential costs of coverage.  So now California (along with only New Jersey and Washington DC) will simply leap over the recent Federal decision to let things slide on the mandate and impose one of its own:

    1. Penalties will be the same as under the ACA with the uninsured owing either $695 per year or 2.5% of their household income, whichever is greater.
    2. Simultaneously the state will drastically increase the number of people eligible forACA subsidies which have been expanded to SIX times the federal poverty limit ($75,000 for an individual and $154,500 for a family).  The current limit is FOUR times.

  • 5 Tips to Beat the Heat | California Benefits Consultants

    August 19, 2019

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    There’s no denying that summer has arrived. In fact, the news has been abuzz with Alaska’s heat wave in July that sent temperatures soaring between 20 and 30 degrees above average. When you are caught in the middle of a heat wave, it may seem like there’s nothing you can do to keep cool. But, there are ways for you to beat the heat this summer and stay safe from heat related illnesses.

     

    Avoid the Heat

    It may seem like a no-brainer to avoid the heat to prevent a heat related illness but some professions work solely outdoors. In those cases, there aren’t many options for avoiding the heat.  Be aware of the hottest time of day and limit physical activity outside during that time.

    Reduce Activity Levels

    Plan the most active job of the day to be in the morning when the sun and heat aren’t as intense. Heatstroke can occur when a person engages in strenuous activity for long periods of time in the heat. If possible, arrange workflows to include times of rest and times to visit a cooling station.

    Drink Fluids Regularly

    The underlying factor in most heat related illness is the inadequate supply of fluids for your body, in other words, drink more water! Heavy sweating depletes a person’s body of fluid and salt and this in turn can cause heat cramps and heat exhaustion. If this occurs, drink cool water or an electrolyte-replacement beverage like Gatorade. To prevent these two illnesses, drink plenty of water before you know you will be outside in the heat so that your body has sufficient fluids in reserve.

    Have a Buddy System

    When you know you will working outside or even playing outside in the heat of the day, make sure you have someone with you. If you should experience a heat related illness while alone, there would be no one available to offer first aid or call for help. As in the case of heatstroke, confusion and weakness along with fainting and possibly convulsions could occur. These are all series symptoms and require immediate action for treatment. The buddy system gives you a safety net of someone else who can recognize these symptoms and can act to save them.

    Take a Dip!

    The best way to beat the heat is by cooling off your body. Not everyone has access to a pool when spending time outside in the heat so if that’s the case, use cold compresses or ice and ice packs to lower body temperature. You can also remove excess clothing and spray your body with cool water. If you do have someone with you and you are experiencing a heat related illness, make sure they are watching you if you jump into a pool.

     

    By following these easy tips to beat the heat you can safely be outside when temperatures are at their peak. Enjoy your summer and stay cool!

  • Top 5 Learning Metrics to Watch | California Benefits Team

    August 14, 2019

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    How much job training equates to time wasted:  About 20%, according to one LinkedIn study.  That’s the percentage of learners who never apply their training to their job.  That same study says 67% of learners apply the lessons learned, but in the end, revert to previous habits.  Another study found 45% of training content is never applied.

    For HR professionals designing or monitoring the Return on Investment of training programs, those are disturbing statistics, especially when you consider the decrease in productivity this causes and the cost of wasted money.

    So, how do you mitigate or address the issue?

    Learning Metrics

    Gone is the day leaders make learning strategy decisions via gut and intuition.  Arrived is the day leaders look at learning data and statistics to make decisions and provide evidence for an action.

    There was a time when the only metrics requested from learning and development officials were the number of people taking part in the training and the cost involved.  In other words:  basic effectiveness and efficiency.

    As with everything, however, learning and development has evolved.  It’s now a business critical change agent.  It’s not enough, though, to measure inputs, the number of courses, and attendance.  Learning and development must look at the output and outcomes.

    “We’re in the process of trying to become a learning organization, and to become a learning organization you have to be nimble.  You have to have a culture of leaders as teachers.  You have to have a culture of recognizing those things that contribute, and actually those things what lead to success,” Brad Samargya said.  Samargya is the Chief Learning Officer for mobile phone maker Ericsson.

    All of the descriptions Samargya is using refer back to the content, specifically how it is delivered and is it of substance.  When both pieces are in concert, HR professionals should see an increase in quality around the metrics gathered.

    Delivery

    First, let’s focus on delivery.

    Samantha Hammock is the Chief Learning Officer for American Express.  Her company employs a learning management system as part of their learning process.  Hammock says measurement is the company’s biggest need.

    “If we’re going to mandate training, we had better be robust in tracking and reporting. Is the experience getting better, is the knowledge increasing. We have put it thru workforce analytics to slice and dice some of those metrics,” Hammock said.

    Of course, learning management systems are not the only way to deliver learning.  Mobile learning for instance, makes content available on smartphones, tablets, and other devices.  Not only is the content accessible anywhere, but anytime.  Video learning is similar in that the content is available in the ever-popular YouTube format.  Gamification, or education by gaming, again delivers learning in a form much for attractive than your regular classroom format, and microlearning, or the strategy of delivering learning content over a short amount of time.

    None of those work without one specific ingredient, however:  the content.  Providing relevant content is key to a good learning strategy, good metrics, and  to ensure your learners are engaged and continue to come back for more.

    The modern employee is distracted, overwhelmed and has little time to spare. Catering content to their needs is not only important – it’s critical.

    The content presented to employees must be applicable and timely to help them with their daily duties, expand their mind, and provide them with quick takeaways that can immediately be applied.

    Metrics to Watch

    There are a handful of metrics derived for HR professionals to analyze.

    1. Completion rates – This metric is important because it indicates the level of learner engagement, motivation and participation. Low completion rates indicate employees aren’t investing in the material or how it relates to their jobs.  High completion rates show employees are invested.
    2. Performance and Progress – This particular metric is split into two categories: the individual and the group.  For the individual, metrics will give you a detailed look at how the employee is doing with the learning.  For the group, the metric will include the details around specific trends.  For instance, how the group is progressing through the material.  Both individual metrics and group metrics allow for the tracking of course effectiveness and engagement.
    3. Satisfaction and approval – This metric gives HR professionals some indication of how the employee or employees feel about the content. The is a powerful metric because it allows HR or learning managers to adjust current content or, if need be, create better content based on the needs of the employee.
    4. Instructor and manager ratings – This metric may not always be applicable as, in some cases, material is not presented by an instructor or manager but through a technology interface of some sort. If that is not the case, this will indicate how learners feel about the instructor or manager.  It can also be directly linked to the reason an employee or group of employees are not learning at the level expected.
    5. Competency and proficiency – Competency and proficiency metrics show HR professionals if employees have the knowledge and skills to achieve a desired outcome. If not, this metric allows for learning managers to adjust the material accordingly.  It also allows from some insight into an employee or group’s currently proficiency.

    In summation

    The challenges facing HR professionals when using analytics to transform the learning and development program are connected.  Before companies can actually engage with the transformation, data has to be present.  Whether it is realized or not, companies do have learning data available.  What may not exist is the ability to evaluate that data.

    Data provides invaluable insight into the future learning opportunities of a company’s workforce.  Now, more than ever before, HR professionals have a real opportunity to do what all leaders and C-suite members want to do:  predict the future.  By leveraging and understanding the data generated by learning programs, HR professionals can better evaluate the content and their effectiveness.  It can lead to better outcomes both developmentally for the employee and financially for the employer.

    By Mason Stevenson

    Originally posted on hrexchangenetwork.com

  • It was not long enough…more time to spend with the family, but it’s not a vacation

    August 14, 2019

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    California Governor Newsom signed into law his first budget, and this included a provision that the Paid Family Leave benefit allowance will be extended from six weeks to eight weeks as of July 2020.  The additional two weeks are allowed for each parent, so in a sense it looks like another month of total family bonding.

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