Tag: Productivity

  • How to Identify Employee Burnout | California Benefits Consultants

    August 5, 2019

    Tags: , ,

    The North Bay Business Journal recently put on their 2019 Heath Care Conference which highlighted physician burnout. An alarming trend in the medical community but, unfortunately, job burnout is not isolated to just the medical field. A study done by Gallup of nearly 7,500 full- time employees found that roughly two-thirds of full-time workers experience job burnout. The study also found that burned out employees are 63% more likely to take a sick day and 2.6 times as likely to be actively seeking a different job. Employee burnout that goes unaddressed will impact both individual and organizational performance. Here are some ways employers can identify employee burnout:

    • Disengagement
    • Decreased productivity or quality of work
    • Increased absenteeism
    • Cynicism

    Some Ways to handle employee burnout

    • Try and get the employee to open up
      -Talking to the employee experiencing burnout will give you (the employer) a better idea of what the employee is experiencing and how you can help them.
    • Allow the employee to take another position temporarily-Some people need a change of scenery. I have personally experienced this where I worked in another department for a while just for change of pace, different job and seeing different faces and location.
    • Encourage PTO

    As stated above, some people need a change of scenery. Studies have shown that taking time away from the job can have physical and psychological health benefits. Time away has shown to lower stress and lessen the risk of heart disease.

    burned-out employees are 63% more likely to take a sick day and 2.6

    times as likely to be actively seeking a different job. Employee burnout that goes unaddressed

    will impact both individual and organizational performance.  Here are some ways employers can identify employee burnout:

    ▪  Disengagement

    ▪  Decreased productivity or quality of work

    ▪  Increased absenteeism

    ▪  Cynicism

    Some Ways to Handle Employee Burnout

    ▪  Try and get the employee to open up

    -Talking to the employee experiencing burnout will give you (the employer) a better idea of what the employee is experiencing and how you can help them.

    ▪  Allow the employee to take another position temporarily

    -Some people need a change of scenery. I have personally experienced this where I worked in another department for a while just for change of pace, different job and seeing different faces and location.

    ▪  Encourage PTO

    -As stated above, some people need a change of scenery. Studies have shown that taking time away from the job can have physical and psychological health benefits. Time away has shown to lower stress and lessen the risk of heart disease.

    By Andrew McNeil

  • March Madness 2019: The Ball is in Your Court | California Benefits Agents

    March 6, 2019

    Tags: , ,

    March Madness is upon us, and there is no avoiding it. Selection Sunday, when the NCAA Division 1 Men’s Basketball Committee announces which 68 teams made the 2019 tournament, is March 17. Games begin with the First Four on March 19 and 20 and culminate with the Final Four April 6 and 8.

    While this annual event can impact productivity, employers may find that the positive effects it has on team engagement and camaraderie outweigh any negatives. Consider these facts from both sides of the coin:

    • An estimated $1.9 billion is lost in workplace productivity during a typical March Madness tournament. (Challenger, Gray & Christmas)
    • Employees will spend 25.5 minutes per workday on March Madness, for a total of 6 hours spread over the 15 workdays when games will be played. (OfficeTeam) This includes time spent by 76 percent of employees who admit to checking scores during work hours and 53 percent who watch or follow sporting events on their computers while at work. (Randstad)
    • As much as $3 billion will be bet on workplace bracket pools during March Madness this year. (FordHarrison) About 40 percent of workers say they have participated in college basketball brackets in their offices, with an average of $22.44 contributed to the pools. (Randstad)
    • Nearly 9 in 10 employees said participating in NCAA brackets at work helped build team camaraderie, and 73 percent said they look forward to going to work more when they are part of an office pool. (Randstad)

    So how can an employer embrace the fun of March Madness while enforcing the rules it may push the limits of? Whether you view the tournament as a minor distraction that creates an opportunity to boost morale, or as a potential pitfall of legal liability, missed deadlines, and dissatisfied customers, the ball is in your court. Here are five ways to maximize the positive aspects of March Madness while minimizing disruptions.

    1. Have fun: Make it clear to your employees that you want them to enjoy work and March Madness while not letting the tournament put a full court press on their work. Encourage employees to wear their favorite team’s clothing and/or decorate their workspace in their team’s colors.
    2. Watch together: Put televisions in break rooms so that employees have somewhere to watch the games other than the internet. That way, connectivity is not slowed and productivity lost even for those not participating in the Madness activities. Provide snacks for the viewers.
    3. Be careful with brackets: Organize a company-wide pool with no entry fee to avoid ethical or legal issues surrounding office gambling. Give away a company gift to the pool winner that is not cash. Keep the brackets posted and updated in the break room.
    4. Be flexible: Allow workers to arrive early so they can work a full shift and still leave in time to see big games that overlap the end of their shift. Conversely, allowing employees to delay their start time the morning after big games may help reduce absenteeism.
    5. Follow the rules: Review applicable company policies—such as gambling, use of personal electronics and company computers, and work and break hours—with your employees before engaging in any March Madness activities at work, so it will be clear to all what is considered acceptable.

    Determine how March Madness fits with your business culture and customer deliverables. If employees are getting their work done, customers are happy, and the biggest problems are reduced internet bandwidth or a little more noise in the cubicles or lunchroom for a couple of days, it’s nothing but net. (See what we did there?) Decide how you’ll be playing this before the opening tipoff and the Madness begins!

    by Rachel Sobel
    Originally posted on ThinkHR.com

  • How to Identify Employee Burnout | California Benefits Consultants

    August 5, 2019

    Tags: , ,

    The North Bay Business Journal recently put on their 2019 Heath Care Conference which highlighted physician burnout. An alarming trend in the medical community but, unfortunately, job burnout is not isolated to just the medical field. A study done by Gallup of nearly 7,500 full- time employees found that roughly two-thirds of full-time workers experience job burnout. The study also found that burned out employees are 63% more likely to take a sick day and 2.6 times as likely to be actively seeking a different job. Employee burnout that goes unaddressed will impact both individual and organizational performance. Here are some ways employers can identify employee burnout:

    • Disengagement
    • Decreased productivity or quality of work
    • Increased absenteeism
    • Cynicism

    Some Ways to handle employee burnout

    • Try and get the employee to open up
      -Talking to the employee experiencing burnout will give you (the employer) a better idea of what the employee is experiencing and how you can help them.
    • Allow the employee to take another position temporarily-Some people need a change of scenery. I have personally experienced this where I worked in another department for a while just for change of pace, different job and seeing different faces and location.
    • Encourage PTO

    As stated above, some people need a change of scenery. Studies have shown that taking time away from the job can have physical and psychological health benefits. Time away has shown to lower stress and lessen the risk of heart disease.

    burned-out employees are 63% more likely to take a sick day and 2.6

    times as likely to be actively seeking a different job. Employee burnout that goes unaddressed

    will impact both individual and organizational performance.  Here are some ways employers can identify employee burnout:

    ▪  Disengagement

    ▪  Decreased productivity or quality of work

    ▪  Increased absenteeism

    ▪  Cynicism

    Some Ways to Handle Employee Burnout

    ▪  Try and get the employee to open up

    -Talking to the employee experiencing burnout will give you (the employer) a better idea of what the employee is experiencing and how you can help them.

    ▪  Allow the employee to take another position temporarily

    -Some people need a change of scenery. I have personally experienced this where I worked in another department for a while just for change of pace, different job and seeing different faces and location.

    ▪  Encourage PTO

    -As stated above, some people need a change of scenery. Studies have shown that taking time away from the job can have physical and psychological health benefits. Time away has shown to lower stress and lessen the risk of heart disease.

    By Andrew McNeil

  • March Madness 2019: The Ball is in Your Court | California Benefits Agents

    March 6, 2019

    Tags: , ,

    March Madness is upon us, and there is no avoiding it. Selection Sunday, when the NCAA Division 1 Men’s Basketball Committee announces which 68 teams made the 2019 tournament, is March 17. Games begin with the First Four on March 19 and 20 and culminate with the Final Four April 6 and 8.

    While this annual event can impact productivity, employers may find that the positive effects it has on team engagement and camaraderie outweigh any negatives. Consider these facts from both sides of the coin:

    • An estimated $1.9 billion is lost in workplace productivity during a typical March Madness tournament. (Challenger, Gray & Christmas)
    • Employees will spend 25.5 minutes per workday on March Madness, for a total of 6 hours spread over the 15 workdays when games will be played. (OfficeTeam) This includes time spent by 76 percent of employees who admit to checking scores during work hours and 53 percent who watch or follow sporting events on their computers while at work. (Randstad)
    • As much as $3 billion will be bet on workplace bracket pools during March Madness this year. (FordHarrison) About 40 percent of workers say they have participated in college basketball brackets in their offices, with an average of $22.44 contributed to the pools. (Randstad)
    • Nearly 9 in 10 employees said participating in NCAA brackets at work helped build team camaraderie, and 73 percent said they look forward to going to work more when they are part of an office pool. (Randstad)

    So how can an employer embrace the fun of March Madness while enforcing the rules it may push the limits of? Whether you view the tournament as a minor distraction that creates an opportunity to boost morale, or as a potential pitfall of legal liability, missed deadlines, and dissatisfied customers, the ball is in your court. Here are five ways to maximize the positive aspects of March Madness while minimizing disruptions.

    1. Have fun: Make it clear to your employees that you want them to enjoy work and March Madness while not letting the tournament put a full court press on their work. Encourage employees to wear their favorite team’s clothing and/or decorate their workspace in their team’s colors.
    2. Watch together: Put televisions in break rooms so that employees have somewhere to watch the games other than the internet. That way, connectivity is not slowed and productivity lost even for those not participating in the Madness activities. Provide snacks for the viewers.
    3. Be careful with brackets: Organize a company-wide pool with no entry fee to avoid ethical or legal issues surrounding office gambling. Give away a company gift to the pool winner that is not cash. Keep the brackets posted and updated in the break room.
    4. Be flexible: Allow workers to arrive early so they can work a full shift and still leave in time to see big games that overlap the end of their shift. Conversely, allowing employees to delay their start time the morning after big games may help reduce absenteeism.
    5. Follow the rules: Review applicable company policies—such as gambling, use of personal electronics and company computers, and work and break hours—with your employees before engaging in any March Madness activities at work, so it will be clear to all what is considered acceptable.

    Determine how March Madness fits with your business culture and customer deliverables. If employees are getting their work done, customers are happy, and the biggest problems are reduced internet bandwidth or a little more noise in the cubicles or lunchroom for a couple of days, it’s nothing but net. (See what we did there?) Decide how you’ll be playing this before the opening tipoff and the Madness begins!

    by Rachel Sobel
    Originally posted on ThinkHR.com

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