Tag: Employment

  • Hot Trends in HR | California Benefits Agency

    April 29, 2019

    Tags: ,

    2019 has ushered in many new trends such as retro cartoon character timepieces, meatless hamburgers, and 5G networks to name a few. Not surprisingly, trend-watching doesn’t stop with pop culture, fashion, and technology. Your company’s human resources department should also take notice of the top changes in the marketplace, so they are poised to attract and retain the best talent. These top trends include a greater emphasis on soft skills, increased workforce flexibility, and salary transparency.

    SOFT SKILLS

    Gone are the days of hiring a candidate solely based on their hard skills—their education and technical background. While the proper education and training are important factors in getting the job completed, a well-rounded employee must have the soft skills needed to work with a team, problem solve, and communicate ideas and processes. According to Tim Sackett, SHRM-SCP and president of HRU Technical Resources in Michigan, “Employers should be looking for soft skills more and training for hard skills, but we struggle with that.” While hard skills can be measured, soft skills are harder to quantify. However, soft skills facilitate human connections and are the one thing that machines cannot replace.  They are invaluable to the success of a company.

    WORKFORCE FLEXIBILITY

    As millennials begin to flood the workplace, the traditional view of the workweek has changed. Job seekers report they place a high importance on having the flexibility of when and where to work. The typical work day has evolved from a 9am – 5pm day to a flexible 24-hour work cycle that adjusts to the needs of the employee. Employers are able to offer greater flexibility about when the work is completed and where it takes place. This flexibility has so much importance that job seekers say remote work options and the freedom of an adaptable schedule have an higher priority to them over pay.

    SALARY TRANSPARENCY

    In the wake of the very public outing of the gender and race pay gaps, companies are opening up conversations about wages in the workplace. Once a hushed subject punishable by termination, salary information is now often being shared in the office. Employers have found that the more transparent and open that they are about the compensation levels in their organization, the more trustworthy they appear to their workforce. One way to stay educated on the welcome trend of pay equality is to visit the US Bureau of Labor Statistics’ website to review wage ranges across the nation. Another great resource is the Department of Labor’s free publication called “Employer’s Guide on Equal Pay.”

    By watching the trends in the marketplace, employers can focus on what is important to their staff. Honest discussions about salary and compensation, when and where to work, and developing the employee as a whole, including soft skills, sets your company up for success. When you listen to what the market is saying, you show you are sensitive to what their priorities are—and this is always on trend.

  • 5 Ways Employers Can Attract and Retain a Hispanic Workforce

    March 22, 2019

    Tags: , ,

    According to the Bureau of Labor and Statistics, the national unemployment rate for the Hispanic population is 4.9%. Here in the North Bay, that number is even less as you have the wine industry, cannabis industry, construction industry, and manufacturers all competing for this valuable workforce. So how do you compete for the workforce you need? We have identified five important things to consider when looking to attract new Hispanic workers and create loyalty with current ones.

    Cultural Understanding
    It is important for employers to familiarize and understand Hispanic culture. This will allow you to better understand, interact and appreciate your Hispanic employees and their culture. This will create a welcoming atmosphere and help build trust between the employer and the employees.

    Flexibility
    Like the non-Hispanic workforce, offering flexibility is crucial to attracting and retaining your employees. But what does flexibility mean? To non-Hispanics, flexibility relates to the broader term “work-life balance”. To Hispanics, the term flexibility relates to family and the ability to take time to care for family members both in and out of the country.

    Benefits and Communication
    Do your Spanish speaking employees understand the benefits and financial investment you have made in them? Employee benefits, particularly health insurance, are not common in Latin America, so just providing a benefits program with no explanation will likely go unappreciated. Many employers are under the impression that just translating these benefits is enough for a Spanish speaking employee to understand them. They may understand the words, but not necessarily the meaning. If your benefits program is going to make an impact on attracting and retaining your Spanish speaking workforce, your organization needs to be equipped with the personnel necessary to not just translate but educate your employees on your benefits program.

    Develop and Engage
    Developing your Hispanic workforce with things like different training programs and mentorship programs will help keep employees engaged with your organization for the long term. People want to help people who are helping them. Further, you can create avoluntaryEmployee Resource Group which is an employee-led group that is meant to foster a diverse, inclusive workplace aligned with the organization’s mission, values, goals, business practices, and objectives.

    Recruit
    Happy employees will ultimately lead to more job applicants. Develop an employee referral program to incentivize employees to refer their friends and family.

     

     

    by Rosario Avila & Andrew McNeil

  • Hot Trends in HR | California Benefits Agency

    April 29, 2019

    Tags: ,

    2019 has ushered in many new trends such as retro cartoon character timepieces, meatless hamburgers, and 5G networks to name a few. Not surprisingly, trend-watching doesn’t stop with pop culture, fashion, and technology. Your company’s human resources department should also take notice of the top changes in the marketplace, so they are poised to attract and retain the best talent. These top trends include a greater emphasis on soft skills, increased workforce flexibility, and salary transparency.

    SOFT SKILLS

    Gone are the days of hiring a candidate solely based on their hard skills—their education and technical background. While the proper education and training are important factors in getting the job completed, a well-rounded employee must have the soft skills needed to work with a team, problem solve, and communicate ideas and processes. According to Tim Sackett, SHRM-SCP and president of HRU Technical Resources in Michigan, “Employers should be looking for soft skills more and training for hard skills, but we struggle with that.” While hard skills can be measured, soft skills are harder to quantify. However, soft skills facilitate human connections and are the one thing that machines cannot replace.  They are invaluable to the success of a company.

    WORKFORCE FLEXIBILITY

    As millennials begin to flood the workplace, the traditional view of the workweek has changed. Job seekers report they place a high importance on having the flexibility of when and where to work. The typical work day has evolved from a 9am – 5pm day to a flexible 24-hour work cycle that adjusts to the needs of the employee. Employers are able to offer greater flexibility about when the work is completed and where it takes place. This flexibility has so much importance that job seekers say remote work options and the freedom of an adaptable schedule have an higher priority to them over pay.

    SALARY TRANSPARENCY

    In the wake of the very public outing of the gender and race pay gaps, companies are opening up conversations about wages in the workplace. Once a hushed subject punishable by termination, salary information is now often being shared in the office. Employers have found that the more transparent and open that they are about the compensation levels in their organization, the more trustworthy they appear to their workforce. One way to stay educated on the welcome trend of pay equality is to visit the US Bureau of Labor Statistics’ website to review wage ranges across the nation. Another great resource is the Department of Labor’s free publication called “Employer’s Guide on Equal Pay.”

    By watching the trends in the marketplace, employers can focus on what is important to their staff. Honest discussions about salary and compensation, when and where to work, and developing the employee as a whole, including soft skills, sets your company up for success. When you listen to what the market is saying, you show you are sensitive to what their priorities are—and this is always on trend.

  • 5 Ways Employers Can Attract and Retain a Hispanic Workforce

    March 22, 2019

    Tags: , ,

    According to the Bureau of Labor and Statistics, the national unemployment rate for the Hispanic population is 4.9%. Here in the North Bay, that number is even less as you have the wine industry, cannabis industry, construction industry, and manufacturers all competing for this valuable workforce. So how do you compete for the workforce you need? We have identified five important things to consider when looking to attract new Hispanic workers and create loyalty with current ones.

    Cultural Understanding
    It is important for employers to familiarize and understand Hispanic culture. This will allow you to better understand, interact and appreciate your Hispanic employees and their culture. This will create a welcoming atmosphere and help build trust between the employer and the employees.

    Flexibility
    Like the non-Hispanic workforce, offering flexibility is crucial to attracting and retaining your employees. But what does flexibility mean? To non-Hispanics, flexibility relates to the broader term “work-life balance”. To Hispanics, the term flexibility relates to family and the ability to take time to care for family members both in and out of the country.

    Benefits and Communication
    Do your Spanish speaking employees understand the benefits and financial investment you have made in them? Employee benefits, particularly health insurance, are not common in Latin America, so just providing a benefits program with no explanation will likely go unappreciated. Many employers are under the impression that just translating these benefits is enough for a Spanish speaking employee to understand them. They may understand the words, but not necessarily the meaning. If your benefits program is going to make an impact on attracting and retaining your Spanish speaking workforce, your organization needs to be equipped with the personnel necessary to not just translate but educate your employees on your benefits program.

    Develop and Engage
    Developing your Hispanic workforce with things like different training programs and mentorship programs will help keep employees engaged with your organization for the long term. People want to help people who are helping them. Further, you can create avoluntaryEmployee Resource Group which is an employee-led group that is meant to foster a diverse, inclusive workplace aligned with the organization’s mission, values, goals, business practices, and objectives.

    Recruit
    Happy employees will ultimately lead to more job applicants. Develop an employee referral program to incentivize employees to refer their friends and family.

     

     

    by Rosario Avila & Andrew McNeil

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