This should be apparent, but apparently it isn’t.  Sometimes prescription drugs, so often dispensed as generics, have a lower price than the copayment stated on the benefit card.  A new study, however, shows that consumers aren’t asking, thus not only paying a higher amount than necessary, but this amount is then “clawed back” by the Pharmacy Benefit Manager (no, the pharmacy does not keep the difference, nor does the insurance carrier) which acts as a middleman between the carrier and the consumer.  During a study period comprising the first half of 2013, a USC study found that overpayments totaled $135 million.  A good example – hydrocodone acetaminophen (that would normally be called “Vicodin”) was prescribed 120,000 times and there was an average overcharge of $6.94.  It is not just generics, moreover.  The brand name drugs of longer standing also often fall under the brand name co payment (Ambien was cited as the most egregious example)  So next time, don’t just reach for the card…