It’s not just California, but a number of states are looking to find a solution to the “problem” supposedly caused by The Affordable Care Act.  The ACA didn’t cause the problems – it merely rode the coattails of problems that have always existed.  Some blame the insurance companies, but in fact while they don’t really help they also are not the cause – costs are up, thus rates are up, and carriers have no apparent handle on any of this.  Will the government?  At least carriers are driven by a profit motive (even the nonprofits) while the government is driven more by social motives which, of themselves, aren’t bad, but they can be so inclusive as to drive costs up even more as they accommodate all the claims and demands made on the system.  The alternative, of course, is that the government is less accommodating, in which case you have a situation with cost controls that can’t be appealed and no option if you don’t like them.

OK, here are the basics in California – the Senate has have passed a bill but now they have to figure how to pay for it (that means replacing premiums with taxes).  Initial estimates are a system cost of $400 billion, which we ain’t got.  There are proponents who counter, however, that the amount of money that will be saved from installing a Single Payer system will counteract these costs – but how?  Thus cost is the ultimate conundrum…and will determine how, if or how well a Single Payer system may work here.

Oh, and the bill is only twenty pages…the Affordable Care Act was 2,000 (to start).  So…